HOME > FAQ > Olympic Games World Archery at Facebook Follow Us @WorldArchery at Twitter World Archery TV on Youtube Latest news on your feed

Frequently Asked Questions: “Olympic Games”

1) How do I qualify for the Olympics?

  • Being a good archer would be an excellent start.
  • Then to be member of a World Archery Member Association of which you have the Nationality (the case of nationality changes is addressed in another question).
  • Your Member Association has to send you or some of your team mates to one of the qualification tournaments (World Championships 2011, Continental Qualifying Tournaments 2011-2012 or the Final Qualification tournament) to obtain a Quota place for your NOC.
  • You have to shoot the minimum qualification standard in the qualification period which is for:
  • Men: FITA Round 1200 or 70m round 600
  • Women: FITA Round 1180 or 70m round 590
  • Based on the national selection system agreed by your Member Association and your National Olympic Committee to be proposed to be part of your National Olympic Team.
……… and lots of practice at the Archery Range
  
2) I have shot 1300 points and the minimum qualification standard is 1200. Can I compete at the Olympics?
It is not only a question of shooting a certain score. To participate in the Olympics your country must win a spot for the Olympic Archery event in your gender and you have to be selected by your country for using this spot. Shooting a high score or even winning the World Cup Final is not enough. There is a limitation of 3 archers per countries as is the case at the World Championships.
 
3) Who decides who can compete at the Olympics?
First of all there is the International Olympic Committee (IOC) deciding on which sports, disciplines and the number of athletes that can compete at the Olympics. The IOC on proposal of World Archery decided on the Quota Allocation system. Archers can win quota places for their NOC in the following 5 ways:
 
  • World Target Championships
  • The 8 highest ranked NOCs in team competition qualify 3 individual places each (8 NOCs x 3 athletes = 24)
  • The 16 top ranked individuals from other NOCs than mentioned above qualify 1 place (16 athletes)
  • Continental Qualification Tournaments
  • The first 3 athletes of Continental Qualification Tournaments in Europe, Asia and Americas qualify 1 place (with a maximum of 2 places per NOC).
  • The first 2 athletes of the Continental Qualification Tournament in Africa and Oceania qualify 1 place (with a maximum of 2 places per NOC).
 
  • Host nation
  • The host nation automatically qualifies 3 places per gender for the individual and team competitions, provided it enters at least 3 athletes per gender at the 2011 World Target Championships
  • Final World Qualification tournament
  • A special qualification tournament will be held at the end of the qualification process. It will be open to all countries that do not have any quota places through the other qualifying tournaments (2011 WOTC and/or CQT). The first 5 athletes will be qualified within the maximum limit of 1 place per NOC and per gender.
 
  • Tripartite Commission Invitations
  • 3 Invitation places per gender will be allocated by the Tripartite Commission among the NOCs of the athletes who have achieved the Minimum Qualification Standard
ALL THESE PLACES ARE AWARDED TO THE NATIONAL OLYMPIC COMMITTEE, NOT TO THE MEMBER ASSOCIATIONS OR THE ARCHERS. It is the National Olympic Committee upon proposal by the World Archery Member Association who decides who can take these places or the NOC can refuse the places.
 
World Archery also has a Minimum Qualification Standard. All Archers competing at the Olympic Games should have reached this level by the end of the qualification period at tournaments that are registered with World Archery (list is on the website – all grades accepted). 
 
4) Why are there only 64 archers competing in each category at the Olympics?
Concerning the Olympic Games the deciding body is not World Archery but the International Olympic Committee (IOC). The IOC has specified the number of athletes Archery may have at the Games and this in the perspective of the total number of athletes in the Games.
 
5) Why is there no Compound at the Olympics?
Concerning the Olympic Games the deciding body is not World Archery but the International Olympic Committee (IOC). The IOC has specified the number of athletes that archery may have at the Games and this in the perspective of the total number of athletes in the Games.
 
Furthermore there is a limitation on the number of events in the Olympic Games. World Archery has asked several times for the Compound category to be included but with no success so far. Since only one type of competition is permitted per sport a Compound competition would not only have to be different from the Recurve competition but also have to compete with other sports such as rugby, karate, roller-skating as a new Olympic sport.
 
6) I have changed nationality or I am thinking of changing nationality. Can I compete at the Olympics?
Please note that all issues related to the changing of sporting nationality of competitors in the Olympic Games are governed by the Olympic Charter and in particular by Rule 42 thereof and its Bye-law, as reproduced below for reference.
 
NB: Also, for reference purposes, here is the link to the e-version of the Olympic Charter (full text) available on the IOC official website: http://multimedia.olympic.org/pdf/en_report_122.pdf
 
Rule 42 of the Olympic Charter:
 
“1. Any competitor in the Olympic Games must be a national of the country of the NOC which is entering such competitor.
 
2. All disputes relating to the determination of the country which a competitor may represent in the Olympic Games shall be resolved by the IOC Executive Board.”
 
Bye-law to Rule 42 of the Olympic Charter:
 
“1. A competitor who is a national of two or more countries at the same time may represent either one of them, as he may elect. However, after having represented one country in the Olympic Games, in continental or regional games or in world or regional championships recognised by the relevant IF, he may not represent another country unless he meets the conditions set forth in paragraph 2 below that apply to persons who have changed their nationality or acquired a new nationality.
 
2. A competitor who has represented one country in the Olympic Games, in continental or regional games or in world or regional championships recognised by the relevant IF, and who has changed his nationality or acquired a new nationality, may participate in the Olympic Games to represent his new country provided that at least three years have passed since the competitor last represented his former country. This period may be reduced or even cancelled, with the agreement of the NOCs and IF concerned, by the IOC Executive Board, which takes into account the circumstances of each case.
 
3. If an associated State, province or overseas department, a country or colony acquires independence, if a country becomes incorporated within another country by reason of a change of border, if a country merges with another country, or if a new NOC is recognised by the IOC, a competitor may continue to represent the country to which he belongs or belonged. However, he may, if he prefers, elect to represent his country or be entered in the Olympic Games by his new NOC if one exists. This particular choice may be made only once.
 
4. Furthermore, in all cases in which a competitor would be eligible to participate in the Olympic Games, either by representing another country than his or by having the choice as to the country which such competitor intends to represent, the IOC Executive Board may take all decisions of a general or individual nature with regard to issues resulting from nationality, citizenship, domicile or residence of any competitor, including the duration of any waiting period.”
 
----------------
In addition, insofar the changing of sporting nationality provided in paragraph 2 of the Bye-law to Rule 42 is concerned (i.e. in the case where less than three years have passed since the competitor last represented his/her former country), this case must imperatively be submitted to the IOC Executive Board; in this respect, we ask the interested NOC to send us an official request for a change of sporting nationality, accompanied by the following documents:
 
  • A photocopy of the competitor’s new passport;
  • The date on which the competitor last competed for his/her former country;
  • The agreement of the NOC for which the competitor last competed;
  • The agreement of the International Federation concerned;
  • The date on which the competitor began living in his/her new country on a permanent basis; and
  • The fundamental reason(s) for which the competitor is requesting a change of sporting nationality.
These documents should be sent by the requesting NOC to the IOC NOC Relations Department, in charge of analyzing the file and submitting the case to the IOC Executive Board.
 
World Archery Federation
Privacy Policy
Maison du Sport International  |  Avenue de Rhodanie 54 1007 Lausanne, Switzerland
Tel: +41 21 6143050 | Fax: +41 21 6143055  |  Email: info@archery.org | How to find us
Copyright 2014
Technology by TFORS Events